China backs GMO Soy

IMAGE: CSIRO (breeding soybeans that are better suited to making soy foods such as tofu and soymilk)
Credit: CSIRO

The worlds #1 importer of soybeans has embarked on a 5-year plan to embrace genetically modified crops. Dominique Patton, reporting for Reuters New Agency, outlines the plans published on government website to push forward with genetically modified cotton, corn, and soybeans. There appears to be more of a focus on corn presently, but soy is definitely in the plan. There is, as expected, some resistance to using the modified seed locally, but the majority of soy used in the country is imported presently, and is genetically modified. Presently, the GMO soy is used as animal feed. The push for GMO crops comes down to one of efficiency for farmers, as the modified crops require less pesticide or are resistant to weed-killer.

No GMOs in S. Korean wheat shipments

(Jack Dykinga photo courtesy ARS/USDA)
(Jack Dykinga photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

In a follow-up to last week’s news concerning South Korea and Japan and GMO wheat, South Korea has found no GMOs in the recent shipment. There is still no clear answer where the rogue wheat came from in Washington state. South Korea is the US’s 5th largest importer of wheat. They will continue to test incoming crops for GMOs and reject any shipments found to contain GMOs. Read the story by Reuter’s Karl Plume in Chicago.

Some Wheat blocked by Japan, S. Korea

A combine drives over stalks of soft red winter wheat during the harvest on a farm in Dixon, Illinois, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Jim Young/File Photo
A combine drives over stalks of soft red winter wheat during the harvest on a farm in Dixon, Illinois, July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Jim Young/File Photo

After this week’s revelation about GE wheat found in Washington state, Japan and South Korea have made a move to ban imports of western white wheat from the U.S.. The ban will stay in place until appropriate testing can be put in place. Similar bans have happened in the past with the Oregon and Montana incidences. Japan has also decided to hold back on distributing and wheat stores in stock until they can be tested. They have not banned all wheat imports, just the ones from the Pacific Northwest. Read the complete story on Reuters.