Monsanto Opts Out
of Australia’s Intergrain

Intergrain chief executive Tress Walmsley in the glass houses with noodle wheat. Picture: Danella Bevis/The Countryman.
Intergrain chief executive Tress Walmsley in the glass houses with noodle wheat. Picture: Danella Bevis/The Countryman.

In a story in The West Australian, it’s reported that Monsanto has sold its shares in Australian GMO wheat (Intergrain) to the Australian government and the Grains Research and Development Corporation. Continue reading “Monsanto Opts Out
of Australia’s Intergrain”

Desi Seeds
Compete with Monsanto

Agricultural Research Service, the research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Agricultural Research Service, the research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture.

In this IndiaTimes article, Madhvi Sally reports that India is preparing to release an indigenous GM cotton. The new variety reportedly does not infringe on Monsanto’s intellectual property rights and should produce a better yield than that previously used. The key genetic trait is the time it takes from planting to harvest. This strain reduces that time by about a third, reducing the chance for pests to ruin the crop (late season pink bollworm infestation).

Kenyan GMO Trials Delayed

In a turnabout decision, Kenya’s NEMA (National Environmental Management Authority) has ruled out immediate trials for GMOs, now requiring the Agriculture ministry to revisit policy. The agency had approved field trials to begin but now says that researchers need to wait for the ministry to approve it. If that happens, the Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Service (Kephis) will begin trials that will likely take up to two years, after which seed multiplication and supply will happen.

The ban on GMOs in Kenya started in 2012, based on a study linking GMOs and cancer in lab rats. The report was later retracted.

 

Survey: Most Florideans
Favor GM Mosquito

Wikimedia Commons - Aedes_aegypti_mosquito
Wikimedia Commons – Aedes aegypti mosquito

Between July and November 2015, a survey of those living in a Key West neighborhood revealed considerable opposition to using genetically modified mosquitos (sample size was 89 households).

In contrast, a recent Annenberg Public Policy survey (509 Florida respondents) tips the scale in the other direction. The Florida respondents were more likely to lean in the direction of GM mosquitos than those from other parts of the country. The center has released a guide for broadcasters covering the issue (there is some useful information for others in there as well).